scubadoc Ten Foot Stop

March 31, 2007

WEB STUFF FROM LARRY “HARRIS” TAYLOR

Filed under: Interesting Newsscubadoc @ 2:31 pm

Divers,
 
This month’s additions, re-appearances, and bunches of updated/re-directs this month to my list of about 8000 links at 
 
 
( the dive only links section of this list is at:  http://www-personal.umich.edu/~lpt/mlinks.htm )
 
This month I added two short editorials:
The “Iceberg Theory” of Teaching

The “Loved One Rule”

 

and I added an article  (will add some in-water photos later)

 

Swim Noodles As A Dive Marker

 

Finally, to avoid bandwidth restrictions, I also had to split the site again (now on 5 accounts) because of a 20% increase in web traffic (for some reason, there was a significant increase in oxygen related downloads)

 

 
Diving
 
Cave Divers Association of Australia: http://www.cavedivers.com.au/

=============================================================================

March 30, 2007

Choosing and Using Dive Computers - New DVD by Steve Barsky

Filed under: Interesting Newsscubadoc @ 4:33 pm

We’ve received a copy of the new DVD by Steven Barsky that I wish I had had available years ago when I bought my first dive computer. With the knowledge in the DVD I would have saved a “few pennies” and gotten a good one the first time around. In their usual professional manner, Steve and Kristine Barsky cover the subject in a fashion that should benefit both the novice and the experienced diver.

The DVD is fact-filled, entertaining and is quite well done in actual field conditions. A great section is shot in the Catalina Hyperbaric Chamber showing computers being tested.

One comes away with the idea that there is no one best computer but that there are at least one or two computers that will fill your needs for the way that you dive.

Produced by Hammerhead Video, the DVD runs for 43 minutes, is divided into easily navigated segments and is highly recommended for your DVD library.

http://hammerheadpress.com/

=======================================================

Jellyfish Stars in New Film?

Filed under: Interesting Newsscubadoc @ 10:18 am

Wetdoc sends us this interesting account of a near miss from Irikandji.

Dear scubadoc,
Jellyfish new star in film :
From Buenos Aires, Omar Sanchez, Wetdoc.

March 29, 2007

Dive Accident Management - from Diving Medicine Online

Filed under: Interesting Newsscubadoc @ 4:40 pm

Logo of Diving Medicine Online
scubadoc Diving Medicine Online

Comprehensive information about diving and undersea medicine for the non-medical diver, the non-diving physician and the specialist. 

Search  Site


Google
Web Diving Medicine Online

Diving Accident Management

Gestión de Accidentes de Buceo
A Power Point Presentation in Spanish


This page is compiled and maintained
by Ernest S Campbell, MD, FACS
scubadoc@scuba-doc.com

Introduction Rescue Resuscitation Position Oxygen
IV fluids Medications InWaterTreatment Transportation Summary


Introduction

It  is  desirable  to  have  a  standard  approach  to  the  initial  management  (i.e. first-aid)  of  an  injured  diver.

Coincidentally, a diver may have a non-diving related illness or injury, but in general, symptoms and signs following a dive are likely to be due to that dive.


Rescue

An injured diver must be removed from the water as quickly as possible. If the diver is unconscious and beneath the surface of the water, then they should be surfaced and decompressed in the head upright, normal anatomic position with special attention being paid by the rescuer to the maintenance of a patent airway. Surfacing feet first would delay the initiation of mouth to mouth for a short period. Air would continue to be forced from the lungs by ascent either way you raise the diver. PADI states that head up is the appropriate method. On the surface, the ‘do-ci-do’ left sided position is what is being taught for mouth to mouth initiation of breathing.

Getting the unconscious diver to the surface as fast as reasonably possible, head up and with the regulator in place would be my recommendation. NOAA does not address this in their new manual and I cannot find any reference to position of retrieval
in the Navy manual.

For other articles about diving safety see http://www.scuba-doc.com/dvsaf.html

A SCUBA diver in this context should have their regulator placed in their mouth, but no attempt at “purging” gas into the injured diver should be made. Divers using rebreathing systems, full-face masks, band masks or helmets should be “flushed-through’ with fresh gas, preferably from an alternative emergency gas supply, before swimming them to the surface or recovering them to a platform or bell. Specific techniques for recovery of a diver into and resuscitation of a diver in a bell or hyperbaric rescue vessel are needed and must be practiced.

In the absence of such a platform, the injured diver should be made positively buoyant by removing their weight-belt and perhaps by inflating their buoyancy-compensator (providing it neither limits access for the rescuer nor causes the injured diver to float “face-down’). The injured diver’s air tank should be left in-situ as it acts as a keel. The rescuer should adjust their own buoyancy by buoyancy-compensator inflation and not by dropping their weight-belt in case they lose hold of the injured diver and have to recover them again from underwater.

The utility of expired-air-resuscitation (EAR) in the water, either directly or via a snorkel, is debatable. Certainly there is a significant difference between conducting EAR in a swimming pool and in the ocean in this context, effective in-water EAR is only possible with continual practice in the ocean and, in general, an injured diver’s best interests are usually served by protecting their airway and getting them out of the water as quickly as possible.


RESUSCITATION

Effective  EAR  and  chest  compression  ( which  obviously  should  not  be  attempted in  the  water )  are  life-saving  if  cardiorespiratory  arrest  occurs,  regardless  of  the cause  of  the  injury.

Techniques  should  not  vary  between  the  diver  who  has  drowned  and  the  diver who  has  been  envenomated,  nor  should  it  be  altered  for  a  hypothermic  diver  (in whom  it  must  never  be  abandoned  until  after  re-warming  has  been  completed).


POSITION

If any form of decompression illness (DCI) is suspected, then the diver must be laid flat and not allowed to sit-up or stand as this may cause bubbles to distribute from the left ventricle and aorta to the brain. Although such posture-induced phenomena are unusual (rare), they have a very poor outcome. This posture must be maintained until the injured diver with DCI is inside a recompression chamber (RCC). A headdown posture is no longer advocated as it may increase the return of and subsequent “arterialization” of venous bubbles, it causes cephalic-venous engorgement such that subsequent middle-ear inflation (e.g. in a RCC during treatment) is very difficult, it limits access for resuscitation and assessment, and, in animal-model studies it actually retards the recovery of brain function in comparison to the horizontal posture.


OXYGEN

With the exception of oxygen toxicity, administration of 100% oxygen is useful in all diving accidents. Although divers who have pulmonary oxygen toxicity need to breathe a PiO2 of less than 0.6 Bars, many of those who have had an oxygen-induced convulsion will subsequently become hypoxic and need oxygen administration.

To administer 100% oxygen, a sealing anesthetic-type mask is needed (unless a mouthpiece and nose-clip in a conscious diver or an endotracheal tube is used) and a circuit with high gas flow-rates and a gas reservoir must be used. Air breaks, to retard pulmonary damage, may be needed, but should be minimized as must all other interruptions. This is one of the reasons why oral rehydration is not particularly useful.

It is noteworthy that administration of 100% oxygen is the definitive treatment of the salt-water aspiration syndrome and most pulmonary barotrauma, including the majority of pneumothoraces. Indeed, chest cannulation is rarely needed.


IV fluids

As with oxygen, aggressive intravenous rehydration is probably of benefit to all injured divers, even those who have drowned. Certainly, such therapy is of considerable benefit in DCI. Isotonic solutions should be used. Glucose solutions should be avoided as they have been shown to increase damage in neurological trauma.

An indwelling catheter should be inserted (filled with water, not air) and an accurate fluid balance is essential. A persistent poor urinary output despite adequate fluid replacement may indicate either persistent hemoconcentration or bladder dysfunction. Either indicates severe DCI and warrants both bladder catheterization and further fluid replacement.


Medications

There are no drugs of proven benefit in the treatment of DCI. Corticosteroids, anti-platelet drugs, aspirin have been tried without success. Lignocaine has been shown to improve neurological outcome of DCS, particularly when added to oxygen. Diazepam is used to prevent and treat oxygen convulsions and to control vestibular symptoms. It makes titration of treatment almost impossible because it masks the symptoms. Indomethacin is useful only when used in combination with prostaglandin and heparin.

Nasal decongestants and analgesics are useful in many divers with aural barotrauma, and, rarely, antibiotics may be indicated.

Some chemotherapy is useful for marine animal injuries. Many coelenterate (jelly-fish) tentacle nematocysts are inactivated by being doused with vinegar. Fish-sting pain is markedly reduced by immersion of the sting-site in hot water.

Box jellyfish stings
Box jelly fish injury

Box jellyfish
   Box jelly fish

Compression-immobilization bandages should be used where possible. Analgesia often requires regional or local anesthetic-blockade and there are specific anti-venoms available for the box jelly fish (Sea wasp), the stone fish and for sea snakes


In-Water Treatment

In-water treatment of DCI is practiced and advocated by some, but is logistically difficult, requires dedicated and effective equipment (e.g. full-face mask; umbilical and breathing system cleaned for oxygen; cradle, chair or platform that can be lowered to the desired depth; warm, calm water without current and dangerous marine animals; and, adequate supplies of oxygen), and clearly should not be used for unconscious, confused or nauseated divers. In general, the diver should be retrieved as quickly as possible to a definitive treatment facility.


Transportation

As for any retrieval of an injured person, stabilization of the diver must precede transportation. This will include resuscitation, delivery of oxygen, insertion of an intravenous line, correction of hypothermia (in divers in the field this should be based on passive re-warming using dry clothes and blankets) or hyperthermia (most likely in closed-diving systems and again the response will need to be specifically developed and practiced), control of hemorrhage and splinting of fractures. A record of oxygen administration and fluid balance is essential.

If DCI is suspected, then the retrieval must not exceed 1000 ft above sea level. A transportable recompression chamber is ideal, but hyperbaric transportations are logistically difficult and considerable time-savings are needed to justify this activity. Many aircraft can be pressurized to “sea-level’ during flight, although this usually limits the altitude at which they can fly (and hence makes the retrieval slower and more fuel-expensive). Unpressurized aircraft are intrinsically unsuitable and must fly at less than 1000 feet, which is often not possible. Road transport may also be inappropriate depending upon the road’s altitude, contour and surface.


Summary
It is desirable to have a standard approach to the initial management (i.e. first-aid) of an injured diver.  An injured diver must be removed from the water as quickly as possible. An injured diver usually requires oxygenation and rehydration. Attention to these, and early adequate retrieval can significantly improve outcome.

Management where no chamber is available

a. 100% O2 by tight-fitting mask in all cases. Continue to treat and transport even if becomes asymptomatic!
b. Oral fluids - 1 liter (non-alcoholic)per hour.
c. IV fluids as soon as possible. Avoid over-loading. One to 2 liters in first hour, then 100 cc per hour. Glucose containing fluids should not be given in the event of neurological DCS. Hyperglycemia increases the chance of neurological damage.
    -Ringer’s solution without dextrose. Hartmann’s, Lactated Ringer’s or Normal saline preferred.
    -Normal saline
    -LMW Dextran (Dextran 40, Rheomacrodex) in saline (alters the charge of the RBC, preventing Rouleaux formation). 500 cc twice daily. Beware of adverse effects of anaphylaxis and pulmonary edema.
d. Medications
    1. Glucocorticoids in neurological DCS.
    2. Diazepam (Valium) 10-15 mg IV or per rectum to control seizures and severe vertigo.
    3. Aspirin is given by some.
    4. Lidocaine is being used by some but is still not yet proven.
e. Catheterization for the paraplegic. Use water in the balloon rather than air. Protect pressure points.
f.  Pleurocentesis, if indicated.
    Transport, transport, transport! Fly in aircraft pressurized at sea level or as low as possible. Beware driving through mountain passes. Have diver accompanied by a person familiar with the facts.


March 27, 2007

“Seasnakes” - From Diving Medicine Online

Filed under: Interesting Newsscubadoc @ 12:44 pm
This web page is a frequently visited site on Diving Medicine Online at http://scuba-doc.com/seasnks.htm
Sea snakes are air breathers probably descended from a family of Australian land snakes. They inhabit the tropical waters of the Indo-Pacific and are highly venomous. Thirty-two species have been identified in the waters about the Barrier Reef in Australia. They seem to congregate in certain areas in the region about the swain Reefs and the Keppel Islands, where the olive sea snake (Aipysurus laevis) is a familiar sight.

Sea snakes have specialized flattened tails for swimming and have valves over their nostrils which are closed underwater. They differ from eels in that they don’t have gill slits and have scales. Due to their need to breathe air, they are usually found in shallow water where they swim about the bottom feeding on fish, fish eggs and eels.

The yellow-bellied sea snake ( Pelamis platurus ) is pelagic, and is seen on occasions floating in massive groups. Fish that come up to shelter under these slicks provide food for the snakes. Occasionally these yellow-bellies get washed up on beaches after storms and pose a hazard to children.

Aggressive only during the mating season in the winter, the sea snake is very curious, and they become fascinated by elongated objects such as high pressure hoses. Advice here is to inflate your BC so as to lift away from the bottom and the snake. Provoked snakes can become very aggressive and persistent –requiring repeated kicks from the fins to ward them off.

Persistent myths about sea snakes include the mistaken idea that they can’t bite very effectively. The truth is that their short fangs (2.5-4.5mm) are adequate to penetrate the skin, and they can open their small mouths wide enough to bite a table top. It is said that even a small snake can bite a man’s thigh. Sea snakes can swallow a fish that is more than twice the diameter of their neck.

Most sea snake bites occur on trawlers, when the snakes are sometimes hauled in with the catch. Only a small proportion of bites are fatal to man, as the snake can control the amount of envenomation, a fact probably accounting for the large number of folk cures said to be 95% effective.

Intense pain is not obvious at the site of the sea snake bite; 30 minutes after the bite there is stiffness, muscle aches and spasm of the jaw followed by moderate to severe pain in the affected limb. There follows progressive CNS symptoms of blurred vision, drowsiness and finally respiratory paralysis. A specific antivenin is available.

=========================================================

“Sharks” - From Diving Medicine Online

Filed under: Interesting Newsscubadoc @ 12:31 pm

This web page is taken from one of the more frequently visited web pages on Diving Medicine Online at http://www.scuba-doc.com/shrks.htm
What do you think of first when you think of sharks? Fearsome, big teeth, of course. Sharks, however, have many other interesting features that make them stand out from other denizens of the sea.

The main difference from other fishes is that their skeleton is made from cartilage rather than bone. This cartilage makes sharks very flexible, allowing them to twist 360 degrees and whirl around and bite an unsuspecting diver or fisherman.

Sharks don’t have an air bladder, and if they stop swimming they will sink. To overcome this disadvantage, they have very large, oil-filled livers giving them some buoyancy. An advantage of not having a swim bladder is that it gives sharks great vertical mobility allowing them to rapidly move upward in the water column without the development of bends. In addition, their pectoral fins act as glide-planes and provide great lift as the shark swims.

Shark meat has an unpleasant taste due to the presence of high concentrations of the waste product urea in the tissue. Sharks store urea to maintain an osmotic balance with seawater so as not to have a water loss problem.

Shark reproduction is very different from that of most bony fishes, having a very low output from their internal fertilization and production of large young.

Sharks also have very low growth rates, a problem that is related to the problem of overfishing. The most economically important sharks are the sandbar, bull, and lemon which do not mature until about 12 to 18 years of age. Slow growth is the norm; for example, a tagged immature male sandbar shark was recaptured 15 years later and had only grown about 19 inches and was still immature.

Sharks can see color, as indicated by the presence of cone cells in their retinas. Similar to cats, they have a light-reflecting layer to enhance their night vision. This is important to divers to realize that swimming and diving in shark infested waters at night is more dangerous.

The reason that chumming works so well in attracting sharks is their acute sense of smell. This could be a warning not to dive with even the smallest cut or abrasion.

An interesting sense that sharks possess is one called electroreception. There is a system of jelly-filled pores around the head and mouth called “ampullae of Lorenzini” that can detect small electric fields of less than 0.01 microvolt. This has been used to develop a small shark repelling apparatus for divers to wear that seems to be effective in warding off sharks.

Why Do Sharks Attack Humans?

Sharks do not attack humans for the sole purpose of hunger. In fact, sharks do not know what the feeling of hunger is, and in fact, can go for many months without eating. This is not to say that sharks do not attack with the intention of seeking prey. Many attacks on divers and surfers especially can be attained to searching for food. To a shark, a surfer on a surfboard slightly resembles that of a seal or sea lion, or a diver in a black wetsuit can look like other prey.

Sharks also attack humans because they have been provoked or agitated by the person. Many spear-fishers have been attacked by reef sharks because when they spear fish, the blood from the fish and it’s vibrations can sometimes result in a feeding frenzy by many sharks. Bright colours can also be counted for attacks. As many people have believed in the past, sharks do in fact can see colours, and do indeed have very good eyesight. Avoid wearing the colours of orange and yellow, as this can aggravate the shark, and possibly lead to attacks.

Sharks are in fact attracted by splashing and vibrations in the water, and it can sometimes be attributed to attacks. Most scientists have not been able to predict why and where sharks attacks.

The following is a list of preventative measures you, as a swimmer or diver can do to prevent the possibility of shark attacks:
# Don’t tease or entice sharks!
# If you cut or injure yourself… get out! Do not stay in the water with blood around you. Sharks can smell blood from over a mile away. And, for the women who read this, if you are in the middle of your menstrual period, please stay out of the water for your own sake.
# Don’t swim in waters that have been deemed dangerous. Avoid swimming in murky waters.
# If you feel something brush up against you…. get out of the water to check to make sure that you have not been bitten. Many shark attack victims have noted the lack of pain from being bitten, doctors and scientists have not been able to conclude why this occurs.. so if you have been brushed against by something, get out and investigate. Finally, if you don’t feel right in the water. Then get out! Nothing can be said for “gut feeling.”
# Watch other fish and turtles in the area–if they start acting erratic–be alert that a shark might be in the area.

Are All Attacks Fatal?

Most shark attacks are not fatal, however, there are a percentage of attacks that are fatal. There are only 4 sharks who consistently attack people: The Great White, The Tiger, The Bull, and The Oceanic White Tip. There are, however, other large sharks that have attacked humans, and can potentially dangerous.

When most sharks attack, the first bite is usually a “tester.” Like most people, when sampling food, they bite once, revel in the taste, and then decide whether or not to continue… with most sharks, sampling occurs as well. The trouble is, with the sampling of a Great White or other larger predatory sharks, the first bite is so massive or severe that many people die from their injuries, and do not actually die from being consumed. A lot of fatalities can be attributed to people bleeding to death or dying from shock.

There are different modes of shark attacks and investigations that sharks go through when they come across humans. The following list shows what a shark can do when it comes across a human.
# Indifference (rare)
# Approach with swift visual inspection from a distance without follow-up
# Approach with surveillance circling - without follow up or follow-up, contact and attack
# Approach with brush-past, without follow-up (wounding possible)
# Charge with collision (upwards trajectory generally)
# Charge with single or double investigative bite without tearing
# Charge with biting and removal of flesh (death in 45% of cases)
# Multiple feeding-frenzy charge (death in 100% of cases)

Shark Attack in South Africa Today

Some interesting patterns can be deduced from examination of the shark attack records from the past 35 years in South Africa. There have been an average of 3 incidents per year, with less than 10% of injuries being fatal. More attacks have taken place in the late afternoon than at any other time of the day, despite most people swimming in the heat of the late morning and early afternoon. This is presumably related to the nocturnal activities of many sharks that venture inshore to feed.

Shark attacks have often taken place in very murky waters secondary to flooding rivers. Bull sharks find these situations extremely attractive and they have been responsible for many attacks in water no more than waist deep.

Research has shown that in recent years both surfers and spearfishermen have been more vulnerable to shark attack than swimmers. This is not surprising as wetsuits enable the wearers to spend long periods in the sea and, furthermore, they venture further offshore than swimmers. Sharks are attracted by the blood and irregular vibrations of a struggling fish after it has been shot, and there are several cases of a spearfisherman being bitten while finning to the surface immediately after he has shot a fish. There has only been a single attack on a SCUBA diver in South Africa, in which the victim was fatally injured while swimming at the surface before descent.

There has been a decrease in fatal injuries in South Africa through the development of a treatment procedure and the widespread availability of a specially designed First Aid kit, known as the Shark Attack Pack. The key to treatment lies in stabilizing the victim before transfer to hospital.

Treatment

Severe trauma or large predator injury (head injury, limb injury due to falls,
equipment crush, prop injuries)

Call for help and immediate transport
Open airway
Treat for shock
Face up neutral position
Direct pressure over bleeding wounds
CPR if no pulse or respirations
Keep warm
Be mindful of the possibility of neck injury
O2 if any question of hypoxemia (Low oxygen in the blood)
Splint limb injuries

==========================================================

March 22, 2007

UHMS 2007 ANNUAL MEETING ONLINE REGISTRATION

Filed under: Interesting Newsscubadoc @ 2:35 pm

Register Online Today at www.regonline.com/UHMS2007Maui

or go to

http://www.uhms.org/2007 Meeting/2007_ASM_Brochure.htm

to download registration forms for attendees and sponsors/exhibitors

======================================================

DIVE NEWS FROM UNDERCURRENT ONLINE

Filed under: Interesting Newsscubadoc @ 2:29 pm

Selected Items reprinted with permission.

Undercurrent — Consumer Reporting for
the Scuba Diving Community since 1975
www.undercurrent.org

Dive News

March 22, 2007


Larry Smith Passes On: Sadly, America’s most revered dive guide died in a Sorong Indonesia hospital earlier this week, presumably due to heart and respiratory failure. Larry Smith, an East Texan who started as a commercial diver servicing power plants, spent many years in the Caribbean before moving on to Indonesia in 1989. He was renowned as the most knowledgeable divemaster in the region, finding critters people didn’t even know existed, and making Indonesian diving known as some of the very best in the world.

His first Indonesian stint was on the Tropical Princess in Irian Jaya (Papua)in 1989 . A while later he took over running the Cehili live-aboard operating in the Banda Sea out of Ambon, and then on to the Sea Contacts out of Bali where Komodo and Alor diving began to get noticed. Then on to Kungkungan Bay Resort, putting Lembeh Straits on the map and training other critter dive guides there, then most recently with Adventure Komodo cruises.

Larry collapsed while aboard the Adventure Komodo near Sorong. Crew members originally assumed he had pneumonia and got him to the hospital in Sorong, where he died shortly after. His body was then flown back to Bali where his wife and daughter live. Larry wrote daily on “Larry’s Log“, and his last posting was on March 15, describing two new dive sites with excellent critter-sighting. Undercurrent readers always raved about their dive trips with Larry in our Chapbook reviews, and he will be sorely missed. Wetpixel.com is compiling a tribute page to Larry and asks divers to send any stories, photos, or video they have of him. His older son Casey is starting a trust fund for Larry’s 9 year old daughter Breezy who lives in Bali.

Scuba with Sailfish for $1200/day: You got to be rolling in dough to afford that kind of trip, however, one of the rarest critters for a diver to encounter underwater is a sailfish. Amos Nachoum has three sail fish trip next year off Isla Mujeres, a small island near Cancun. He takes only four divers and one week is already sold out. You can see his January photos here. If you go, may we suggest an armored codpiece?

Spiegel Grove Deaths: Three experienced New Jersey divers who had charted a boat from Scuba-Do in Key Largo, Florida, died last Friday. Two who got lost within the wreck were unable to get out, a third finally emerged but died surfacing, while a fourth diver did find his way out and survived. Sadly, their deaths are apparently attributable to stupid errors.They did not have a dive plan. They did not have enough stage tanks placed in appropriate areas. They did not set lines to guide them back out of the wreck. They penetrated an area at 135 feet off limits to divers, where it is easy to disturb the silt and get lost. The three dead divers were Jonathan Walsweer, 38, and Scott Stanley, 55, of Westfield, N.J.; and Kevin Coughlin, 51, of Chatham Borough, N.J. The survivor was Howard Spialter, 52, also of Westfield. According to information he gave investigators, the other three might have survived if they had followed his path out of the wreck, but they chose a different direction. Six people have died while diving the Spiegel Grove, a 1960s-era warship sunk off the Upper Keys in 2002 to create an artificial reef. Already, eight divers have died this year in Florida.

Do You Have Dive Equipment Insurance? Have you ever filed a claim for lost, stolen or damaged diving equipment? Several insurance companies cover dive equipment (DEPP and DAN are two and home owners insurance also covers dive equipment in many cases). We’d like to hear the experiences of divers who have equipment insurance. Did the coverage hold up? Any hassles? Were you satisfied? Let us know and we’ll report on dive equipment insurance policies in an upcoming issue. Please let me hear your story. Email me at EditorBen@undercurrent.org

A Real Twofer: Brac Reef Resort, now the only dive resort on Cayman Brac since Divi closed, is offering a two-for-one deal for the week of May 12 -19. Seven nights accommodation, 17 dives and meals priced at $1,592 for two. Now you can find prices like that in the Honduras, but never in the Caymans. Act fast, since this will sell out. www.bracreef.com.

Scuba TV: Now there’s a show just for divers. Apple’s iTunes store offers downloads of “ScubaVisions TV,” a videocast that takes 5- to 10-minute underwater tours of a new dive site every week. Previous episodes of the show, which launched in February, show dives at the Turks and Caicos sites of Shark Hotel, Football Field, and the Southwind and W.E. wrecks. The next shows will head north to Florida and along the Atlantic coast. www.scubavisions.com

Great New Fish ID Book: The newest addition to our must-read list is A Diver’s Guide to Reef Life by Andrea and Antonella Ferrari. This 418-page colorful reference guide has 1,300 excellent color photographs of tropical marine species in reefs worldwide. The authors, married marine photographers, also give tips for better underwater photos. This hardcover book’s list price is $55 but if you order this or any of our dive book picks through www.undercurrent.org, you’ll get Amazon.com’s best price, plus we’ll donate the profit to save coral reefs.

Note: Undercurrent is a not-for-profit organization. Our travel writers never announce their purpose, are unknown to the destination, and receive no complimentary services or compensation from the dive operators or resort.

——————————————————————————–

March 21, 2007

UHMS ATLS POST COURSE CANCELLED

Filed under: Interesting Newsscubadoc @ 4:01 pm
Unfortunantly, the ATLS Post Course that was scheduled for June 17-18, 2006 at the Ritz-Carlton, Maui has to be cancelled.  The office in Hawaii that must endorse the ATLS course and do a site inspection could not get things arranged on their end, so the course can not be held.  We will organize the ATLS Course to be held at our 2008 Annual Scientific Meeting in Salt Lake City, UT.  We apolgoize for inconvience this has caused. 
We will be replacing the ALTS post course with a one day course JUNE 17 titled:
Medical-Legal Aspects of Fitness to Dive & Practice of Hyperbaric Medicine

Mission Statement

To make a course available to Undersea and Hyperbaric Medicine physicians that addresses the medical-legal aspects of practicing medicine in this specialty.  This so as to make physicians in this specialty better equipped to conduct initial physical examinations of all categories of divers and to become sharply aware of the legal ramifications of conducting return to work physical exams after a diver has suffered and injury or a decompression problem.  Additionally, the course is designed to make these same physicians more acutely aware of legal pitfalls in the practice of Hyperbaric Medicine.

Needs Assessment

Through certifying over 145 physicians as Diving Medical Examiners through UHMS’s Medical Assessment for Fitness to Dive course it is clear that these topics are not well understood by a large majority of physicians…presuming the 145 are representative of the general population of physicians in the United States.  Clearly, the need for such a course exists.

Expected Results

This is an awareness course, not a qualifier for doing anything in particular.  Thus the only objective is to present medical-legal information that relates to Diving Medicine and Hyperbaric Medicine in such a way that causes physicians to become aware of the legal ramifications associated with performing diving physical exams and pressurizing a patient in a hyperbaric chamber for the purpose of providing adjunctive therapy for wound healing or other medical conditions that will respond to hyperbaric therapy.

 

The morning session will deal with medical-legal issues physicians need to pay particular attention to when conducting physical examinations for divers, whether they are commercial, recreation, scientific, or public safety divers.  The afternoon sessions will concentrate on medical-legal issues that face practitioners of Hyperbaric Medicine.  These issues will be several and will include the ramification of refusing HBOT for medical conditions that respond favorably to such therapy when HBOT is available. 

Sunday, June 17, 2007

Start Time

 

Stop Time

 

 

9:00

a.m.

-

12:00

p.m.

Medical-Legal Aspects of Assessment for Fitness to Dive

Bobby Delise, Attorney at Law and Admiralty

12:00

p.m.

-

1:00

p.m.

Lunch

On Your Own

1:00

p.m.

-

4:00

p.m.

Medical-Legal Aspects of the Practice of Hyperbaric Medicine

Bobby Delise, Attorney at Law and Admiralty

March 13, 2007

UHMS Annual Scientifc Meeting

Filed under: Interesting Newsscubadoc @ 12:04 pm

UHMS Annual Scientifc Meeting: June 14-17

UHMS ASM INFORMATION: http://www.uhms.org/Meetings/AMMeetingsMain.htm

KRONHEIM LECTURE:  JUNE 15

“THE HISTORY OF DEEP SEA EXPLORATION”  

Guest Speaker: RALPH WHITE

Ralph White will present a cinematic trip through several of history’s greatest underwater finds including pictures of the Titanic, Volcanic Vents, unique deep sea marine life and other tantalizing finds.

The History of Deep Sea Exploration: In 1975 Emory Kristof and Ralph White initiated the “Beebe Project” at the National Geographic Society. It was to be a ten year exploration of our planet’s depths, which is still on going. They started off in Loch Ness, Scotland looking for the fabled “Nessie”, and went on to discover two Revolutionary Wrecks and the oldest U.S.N. / M.I.A’s in Lake Ontario. From their to the frozen North and the wreck of the H.S.M. Breadalbane above the Artic Circle. They did the imaging that proved the theory of Plate Tectonics, found the first deep sea volcanic vents, and their unique life form’s, which could be the start of life on Earth. They utilized underwater baiting to bring in some of the rarest deepsea animals ever imaged “In Situ”, including the largest flesh eating Shark ever photographed, in Suruga Bay, Japan. Also included are deep dives in remote Lake Baikal, Siberia, The Titanic, and many other interesting sites, including the first survey of the USS Arizona, and “Sacred Wells” in the Yucatan of Mexico. In one hour you see three decades of the greatest underwater explorations ever done on our planet!

Ralph White’s Bio:

Ralph White enjoys a very distinguished professional career as an award-winning cinematographer, video cameraman and editor, with over 30 years of production experience and hundreds of motion picture and television credits to his name.

 

Ralph is one of the few people experienced in the methodology and technology required to safely reach the deep ocean depths in order to acquire images.  In 1985, he documented the expedition that found the Wreck of the RMS Titanic, and in 1987 and 2000, he co-directed the salvage operation and photography during the recovery of over 5,000 artifacts from Titanic’s debris field.  He was the submersible cameraman for the 1991 IMAX feature film Titanica, and in 1995-96, he was the expedition leader and second unit cameraman for James Cameron’s Academy Award winning feature film Titanic.  White has made 35 dives to the –12,000 foot deep wreck of the Titanic, and has qualified as a copilot on the French Nautile and Russian Mir submersibles.  He was operations supervisor of the Medusa ROV for James Cameron’s 3D IMAX film Ghosts Of The Abyss and technologies coordinator for James Cameron’s live broadcast from the deck of the ship for the Discovery Channel’s Last Mysteries of Titanic.  Ralph was also the deep sea imaging and guest wreck expert for the History Channel’s Titanic’s Last Moments, which just aired last month. 

 

For more than 25 years, Ralph has served as a contract cameraman for the National Geographic Society, where he and staff photographer Emory Kristof pioneered the development of advanced remote cameras, 3D Video, HDTV, and deep ocean imaging and lighting systems.  Those assignments included the Discovery of Active Volcanic Vents along with their unique biological colonies in the deep waters of the east Pacific rise and Mid-Atlantic ridges; and the first multinational Exploration of Lake Baykal, in remote Siberia.  He has filmed the world’s whales and sharks, including the largest ever seen flesh eating shark, a 30’ Somniosus Pacificus.  He has been to both poles, and filmed the 153-year-old wreck of the HMS Breadalbane under the Arctic ice cap.  Other NGS credits include Loch Ness, Suruga Bay, Wild Horses, Reptiles, Sharks, The Beebe Project, and The Great Whales, which won the coveted Emmy for Best Documentary.  His cinematography has won the Grenoble Film Festival Gold Medal, Golden Eagle, Cindy, and Golden Halo awards.

 

White was one of the field producers and cameramen for the Alan Landsburg television series Those Amazing Animals and That’s Incredible, as well as Bill Burrud’s Animal World, Challenging Sea, Treasure, Islands In The Sun, True Adventures, The Wonderful World of Women, and Wanderlust.  White was one of the innovators in documenting the behind-the-scenes makings of a major motion picture with Columbia’s The Deep, 20th Century Fox’s Tora-Tora-Tora, and The Valley Of The Dolls.  He co-hosted and was a segment producer and cameraman for Jack Douglas’ Adventure and Journey series.  He’s covered the thrills of victory for ABC’s Wide World of Sports, NBC’s Sports In Action, and CBS’ Sports Spectacular.  His commercial credits include D.B. Needham, J. Walter Thompson, D.J.M.C., and the Honig, Cooper and Harrington advertising agencies.

 

Ralph is a highly qualified helicopter and astrovision aerial specialist, and a former member of the United States Parachute Team.  He co-invented the Bell camera helmet which he used in filming free fall skydiving sequences for Ivan Tors’ Ripcord series.

 

Ralph White is a Knight, Order of Saint Lazarus and Knight, Order of Constantine for his filming and conservation accomplishments.  His extensive field experience has been rewarded by his peers as:  Fellow, The Royal Geographical Society; Fellow and recipient, the Lowell Thomas Award for life achievements from The Explorers Club; Fellow and current Chairman of the Board, The Academy of Underwater Arts and Sciences, and is a Past President of the Adventurers Club.  He served in the U.S. Marine Corps as a Force Reconnaissance Team Leader, and is a highly decorated Reserve Forces Captain, who commanded the elite and award-winning Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department’s Photographic Unit.


R.M.S. TITANIC & Ralph B. White

1976: MEMBER OF THE ORIGINAL TEAM CONSISTING OF DR. ROBERT BALLARD FROM WOODSHOLE OCEANOGRAPHIC INSTITUTE, EMORY KRISTOF FROM THE NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC SOCIETY, AND BILL TATUM OF THE TITANIC HISTORICAL SOCIETY WHICH CONCEIVED OF THE IDEA OF FINDING THE WRECK OF THE R.M.S. TITANIC.

1978: CAMERAMAN FOR THE NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC TEAM THAT DEPLOYED A -12,500 FOOT DEEP OCEAN IMAGING & LIGHTING SYSTEMS FROM THE U.S. COAST GUARD CUTTER “EVERGREEN” OVER THE REPORTED SINKING SITE OF THE TITANIC, 41 DEGREES 46 MINUTES NORTH, 50 DEGREES 14 MINUTES WEST.

1985: CAMERAMAN FOR THE FOUR MAN AMERICAN TEAM OF DR. ROBERT BALLARD, EMORY KRISTOF, AND BILLY LANG, BEGINNING PHASE ONE (THE SONAR SEARCH) FOR THE R.M.S. TITANIC ABOARD THE IFREMER RESEARCH VESSEL “LE SUROIT” UTILIZING THE FRENCH “S.A.R.” SIDE SCAN SONAR SYSTEM.

CAMERAMAN FOR THE PHASE TWO (THE ELECTRONIC IMAGING SEARCH) ABOARD THE WOODSHOLE RESEARCH VESSEL “KNORR”, WHICH FOUND THE WRECK OF THE TITANIC ON SEPTEMBER 1, 1985 UTILIZING THE TOWED VEHICLES “JASON” AND “ARGO”.

1987: AMERICAN TEAM LEADER AND DEEP SEA IMAGER FOR THE TITANIC ARTIFACT RECOVERY EXPEDITION ABOARD THE IFREMER RESEARCH VESSEL “NADIR”, UTILIZING THE DEEP DIVING SUBMERSIBLE “NAUTILE.” TO DOCUMENT THE RECOVERY OF OVER 1,400 ARTIFACTS FOR AN INTERNATIONAL PRESERVATION AND TRUST FUND, WHICH WILL EXHIBIT THESE RELICS.

1991: IMAX CAMERAMAN AND NAVIGATOR FOR THE FEATURE LENGTH IMAX FILM “TITANICA”, UTILIZING THE RUSSIAN RESEARCH VESSEL “KELDYSH” AND THEIR TWO SUBMERSIBLES “MIR I & MIR II” WHICH WERE EQUIPPED WITH THE NEWLY SUPERVISED DESIGN AND BUILDING OF THE 5,000 WATT H.M.I. LIGHTING SYSTEMS.

1992: CO-EXPEDITION LEADER FOR THE MAREX / R.O.V. TITANIC OPERATION ABOARD THE R/V SEA MUSSEL, WHICH RESULTED IN THE FAMOUS TITANIC OWNERSHIP LEGAL BATTLE.

1994: DEVELOPED SPECIALIZED PHOTOGRAPHIC & LIGHTING EQUIPMENT ALONG WITH PLANNING THE SECOND UNIT FILMING ON THE WRECK OF THE TITANIC FOR FILMMAKER JIM CAMERON.

1995: EXPEDITION LEADER AND SECOND UNIT CAMERAMAN ABOARD THE R/V KELDYSH FOR THE JIM CAMERON FEATURE FILM “TITANIC”.

1999: CO-EXPEDITION LEADER, PHOTOGRAPHER, AND TITANIC LECTURER FOR THE TOURIST DIVES TO THE WRECK OF THE TITANIC WITH THE RUSSIAN MIR’S.

2000: DIRECTOR OF SUBMERSIBLE ARTIFACT RECOVERY, IMAGING FOR RMS TITANIC, INC’S. “OPERATION TITANIC 2000″, WHICH RECOVERED OVER 900 SELECTED ITEMS FROM MY SEARCH AND SALVAGE PLAN.

2001: OPERATIONS SUPERVISOR FOR THE TITANIC DIVES OF THE “MEDUSA ROV” ON THE TITANIC FOR JAMES CAMERON’S 3-D IMAX FILM “GHOST OF THE ABYSS.

2005: TECHNOLOGIES COORDINATOR FOR JAMES CAMERON’S LIVE BROADCAST FROM THE DECK OF TITANIC FOR THE DISCOVERY CHANNEL’S “LAST MYSTERIES OF THE TITANIC”.

DEEP SEA IMAGING AND GUEST TITANIC WRECK EXPERT FOR THE HISTORY CHANNEL’S “TITANIC’S LAST MOMENTS” WITH DEEP SEA DETECTIVES JOHN CHATTERTON AND RICHIE KOHLER.

CREDENTIALS:

NUMBER OF DIVES: 35 ABOARD A MANNED DEEP DIVING SUBMERSIBLE.

UNDERWATER HOURS ON TITANIC: 400+ HOURS [MORE THAN CAPTAIN SMITH].

FELLOW, THE ROYAL GEOGRAPHICAL SOCIETY; FELLOW, THE EXPLORER’S CLUB; AND RECIPIENT OF THE LOWELL THOMAS AWARD FOR LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT IN DEEP OCEAN EXPLORATION.

1992 NOGI AWARD AND FELLOW, ACHIEVEMENTS IN THE UNDERWATER ARTS.

CURRENT CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD OF THE ACADEMY OF UNDERWATER ARTS AND SCIENCES.

EXPLORER IN RESIDENCE, THE CANADIAN TITANIC SOCIETY.

PAST PRESIDENT, THE ADVENTURERS’ CLUB.

1998 DIVER OF THE YEAR / SCIENCE, THE UNDERWATER SOCIETY OF AMERICA.

MEMBER, THE DEEP SUBMERGENCE PILOTS ASSOCIATION.

LIFE MEMBER, THE U.S. NAVY SALVAGE DIVERS ASSOCIATION.

SPOKESPERSON FOR THE IMAX FILM “TITANICA” [OVER 45 PREMIERES].

TITANIC LECTURE SERIES [OVER 300 WORLDWIDE PRESENTATIONS].

SPECIAL TITANIC CONSULTANT, THE IRISH NATIONAL HERITAGE FOUNDATION.

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March 9, 2007

UHMS UPDATES FROM DON CHANDLER

Filed under: Interesting Newsscubadoc @ 10:44 am
1.  DMAC/EDTCmed Approves the UHMS Fitness to Dive Course.
2.  Status of Biomarine Expedition in Hawaii.
3.  Advanced Trauma Life Support Training as a Post-Course.
4.  Status of our 40th Annual Scientific Meeting.

1.  DMAC/EDTCmed Approves the UHMS Fitness to Dive Course.  The Diving Medical Advisory Committee of Europe and the medical subgroup of the European Diving Technology Committee has approved the UHMS Medical Assessment for Fitness to Dive course.  This is an important juncture for this course because it is now recognized internationally.  We may be applying for post graduate credit with our Eruopean colleagues soon, but for now our thanks go out to the reviewers for DMAC and EDTC!  The official approval letter is being drafted as I write this.  To date , we have conducted the course in the U.S., Canada, and Mexico and have certified over 160 physicians as Diving Medical Examiners.  Our next course will be next month in Florence, Italy on April 15-18.  The venue will be the Villa dei Bosconi…you can visit their website at www.villadeibosconi.it/eng/default.asp  We still have some openings for the course in Florence so anyone interested, can find an application on the UHMS website at www.uhms.org or you can email me and I will send you an application.  By the way, any U.S. physician who plans to take the specialty board exam for Undersea and Hyperbaric Medicine would be wise to attend this course prior to taking the exam.  I have been told by several physicians who took our course before taking the specialty exam that it was of great value to them.

2.  Status of Biomarine Expedition in Hawaii.  We just had two who were going to go on the expedition prior to our annual meeting this summer canceled their reservations.  As much as they love diving, they decided that ATLS training was of more benefit to them and would be within their budget only if they skipped the diving and attended the post-course.  This means we have two slots yet open for any of you who would like to spend a week of diving on a live-aboard boat that operates out of the big island of Hawaii.  If you are interested, please contact Dr. Richard Smerz directly to make reservations. He can be reached at (808)587-3425 or you can email him at rsmerz@htchawaii.com  This expedition is going to be a full week of great diving and education.

3.  Advanced Trauma Life Support Training as a Post-Course.  Dr. Richard Sadler is putting this course together for us. It will be offered June 17 and 18 immediately following the conclusion of our annual scientific meeting.  When I first told you about the possibility of having this course, we were of the opinion that we could do a course for 25 attendees, but we have now learned that the maximum class size is 16.  With the number of people who have indicated an interest in the ATLS course, these openings will not last long.  Please go to our website and register for the annual meeting and you will find the ATLS course as one of the options  The cost is $1,000 per person.  If you want to attend only the ATLS training, you will still need a registration form so we have your name, and other information but you will need to check only the ATLS course among the several options.  If we receive more than 16 requests for the ATLS training, we will begin a wait list for anyone who drops out of the training or, possibly, forming a second class.

4.  Status of our 40th Annual Scientific Meeting.  Our 2007 Annual Scientific Meeting Planning Committee has now received over 140 abstracts for presentation at our 40th anniversary meeting in Maui.  This all but guarantees a top drawer meeting for all attendees.  If you are still vacillating on whether to attend due to the cost, let me remind you once more that you can travel to Maui cheaper than you can travel to many locations within the contiguous 48 states.  Some employers need to know this so please help spread the word that going to our 40th anniversary meeting will not break the bank.  Our planning committee is planning several historical events that everyone will enjoy…you really won’t want to miss these so when you get your program at registration, mark these historical events as a “must go”.
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March 6, 2007

OUR WORLD _ UNDERWATER SCHOLARSHIP SOCIETY

Filed under: Interesting Newsscubadoc @ 9:37 am

From Glen H. Egstrom, Chr. Selection Committee

 

The Our World Underwater Scholarship Society is proud to introduce Brenna Mahoney as the North American Rolex Scholarship recipient for 2007. Brenna is a graduate of Cornell University with a BS in Biology, Cum Laude and comes to us with a strong background in diving that includes certification as a scientific diver by the American Academy of Underwater Sciences.  She has a varied background in field research and has studied at Friday Harbor Laboratories in Washington state, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Maine and the Harvell Laboratory at Cornell University in New York. She enjoys teaching and is determined to work in research areas that will lead to increased public awareness with regard to Ocean Ecology and Marine Systems.

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March 4, 2007

UHMS Gulf Coast Chapter Annual Scientific Meeting

Filed under: Interesting Newsscubadoc @ 11:18 am

 
Mark Your Calendars!
 
UHMS Gulf Coast Chapter Annual Scientific Meeting
August 30 - September 1, 2007 (Labor Day Weekend)
Nashville, Tennessee
 
Call for Papers and Registration Information To Follow
 
Click Here to see last year’s meeting
 
Click Here to see about Nashville, Tennessee
 
For More Information Contact Suzanne Pack at gcc@uhms.org or 210-614-3688
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March 2, 2007

PELAGIC DIGITAL DIVE COMPUTERS RECALLED

Filed under: Interesting Newsscubadoc @ 10:19 am

About 2,800 Oceanic and AERIS Digital Dive Computers, manufactured by Pelagic Pressure Systems, because when performing a switch from one gas to another during a dive, the dive computer’s display will lock up and not return to the main dive screen that displays dive times. This can lead divers to enter decompression unknowingly or ascend prematurely, which can result in decompression sickness. The company has received one report of two dive computers malfunctioning and no reports of injuries.
The recall includes Oceanic-brand ATOM 2.0 dive computers with serial numbers 1 through 2079 (Revisions 2E, 3A, and 3B) and AERIS-brand EPIC dive computers with serial numbers 1 through 712 (Revision 1A), which can be viewed on the computer’s display. The ATOM 2.0 dive computers have a manufacture date ranging from Aug. 23 to Nov. 23, 2006. EPIC dive computers’ manufacture date ranges from Oct. 18 to Nov. 14, 2006. The serial number and manufacture date are also printed on the bottom of the item.
Authorized Oceanic dealers nationwide sold the ATOM 2.0 dive computers from August 2006 through February 2007. Authorized AERIS dealers nationwide sold the EPIC dive computers from October 2006 through February 2007.
Consumers should visit the dive computer’s dealer for a free software upgrade. For more information, call Pelagic at 888-854-4960 or visit http://www.OceanicWorldwide.com or http://www.diveaeris.com. Information can also be found at http://www.cpsc.gov.

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